The Importance of Communication Skills in Cosmetology

Cosmetologist using communication skills with client

There are many reasons that someone might consider cosmetology as a potential career path. Professions in the cosmetology industry can be both thrilling and rewarding in a lot of different ways. Helping people feel like the best version of themselves can be very fulfilling and there are many avenues of cosmetology to choose from. Skin, hair, nails and makeup are all areas that can be explored through cosmetology. The take your career to the next level, to gain new customers and retain current customers, a cosmetologist needs good communication skills.

Why Communication is Key

Speaking to clients is just as important as being able to perform the tasks of your job. Communication is how you sell your services and ensure that your clients are satisfied with your work. If you have poor relational skills or weak communication, it can do serious and lasting damage to your professional reputation. Which is why it is understandable that a significant amount of cosmetology students or those considering a career in any field of cosmetology may be anxious about this particular aspect of the industry. Luckily, there are some tips you can remember and some points to keep in mind so that you can feel confident about communicating with clients no matter what career in cosmetology you want to pursue.

Communication Skill #1 – Clarity

It is easiest when you are dealing with a client who can clearly communicate what they want. This is not always the case. You will encounter someone who has trouble describing or explaining what they want from you or how they want to look. You will need to get creative and rely on the strength of your own communication to come to an understanding. When you are trying to clarify communication between the client and yourself, remember that it is all about understanding what the client expects, and adjusting those expectations to them.

Expectations

You can only please a client if you know what they want. So, the first thing that you will need to do is make sure that you have a solid grasp on what your client is expecting from you. Using visual and celebrity references can help. You can use color charts so that clients can better understand and identify the specific color they are expecting. If a client is coming to you with a problem, they are hoping to get some professional help with. It is also important that you understand the full scope of the issue before beginning. Some areas of cosmetology can deal with vulnerable skin and hair issues. When you are attempting to get some clarification or information about these problems it is important that you ask questions in the most sensitive way possible.

Adjustments

Even if you are the most skilled person in your profession there will come a time that a client will approach you with an impossible request. Adjusting a client’s expectations is a key part in any cosmetologist’s communication. It is important to keep in mind that honesty is the best policy when a client’s request is unreasonable or impossible. Knowingly disappointing a client with a false expectation is bad for business. When you encounter these communication challenges, the important thing is to have other options ready to present. The disappointment of not getting exactly what they want can be dissuaded with creative and mindful alternatives. Some people will be unhappy no matter what kind of adjustment you present to them. However, you will find that most people will happily take a compromise when you present them with a legitimate concern about their initial expectation.

Communication Skill #2 – Compromise and Confrontation

Client confrontation can be the most intimidating part of considering a career in cosmetology. You can excel in every area of your profession, but if you are unable to communicate to reach a compromise with your clients it will be difficult to retain clients. Communicating concerns and offering solutions are the two main areas to deal with the difficult side of client communication.

Communicating Concerns

There are many ways a client’s expectations might be impossible for you to meet. A client might want a last-minute appointment that you don’t have time to fit into your schedule. It could be someone who wants a hair treatment that would severely damage their hair. It also might be as sensitive as declining esthetician services because of a skin condition you can’t identify. Regardless of the issue, the first thing to remember is that you don’t want to humiliate your client or make them feel stupid. There may be times that you can ask question that lead your client to draw their own conclusions in your favor. Other times it may require a simple, thoughtful explanation of a certain restriction or challenge that needs to be addressed. There could even be a time when you will have to politely let your client know that they have an issue that is beyond your training and expertise. However, you need to clearly communicate your concern about an issue, the key skill you will need in confronting a client is kindness. Your consideration for their preferences and feelings will speak volumes.

Offering Solutions

Being able to present attractive, comparable alternatives to your clients when you can’t give them exactly what they want is a significant part of keeping them happy and returning. A combination of planning, skill and genuine effort goes a long way in the alternative solution department. You can’t prepare for every possible scenario but getting to know your clients’ styles and personalities might help you better troubleshoot with them. Keeping your communication skills sharp and up-to-date will allow you to offer your client a greater range of alternative that may approximate what they were originally looking for more closely. Even with things as simple as a scheduling conflict, an effort to reschedule and sincere concern for your client’s needs can make a big difference.

Communication Skill #3 – Confidence

Cosmetology is all about expression. Whether it is an esthetics treatment, completely new hairdo, an interesting manicure or am intense makeup makeover, cosmetology helps us bring things to the surface for the world to see. Confidence is an enormous part of that expression. A client’s confidence in your skill and ability, as well as confidence in their own appearance are a core part of successful cosmetology on any level.

Professional

If a client isn’t confident in your professional skills it is going to be easy for anxiety and tensions to rise. There are ways that you can demonstrate your ability besides hanging your cosmetology license on the wall or handing someone a portfolio. With new clients and prospective projects, it is important for you to exude confidence in your own skill. If you seem relaxed and sure of what you are doing the client to feel the same way. Practicing and staying current on trends will help build a solid foundation for your professional confidence, and allow others to feel confident in you, too. Continuing this level of professionalism throughout your relationships with your clients will help them feel secure in approaching you about trying new or challenging things.

Personal

There is nothing better in cosmetology than helping someone achieve the look they were hoping for. Likewise, disappointing a client can hurt your self-esteem and your professional reputation. So, it is important that your client not only looks good, but feels good about your work. Your communication skill level doesn’t have to be extraordinary for you to help someone feel good about themselves.

The Power of Positivity

Did your client have a creative idea? Let them know how innovative they are, even if it turns out to be something you can’t do. Does your client have a particularly attractive feature you want to help them accentuate? Tell them so. Is your client’s style unique? Compliment them on it. Along with enhancing your skills to give your best to your clients, it is a good idea to speak positively to your clients and to affirm their appearance choices every time you get a chance.

Cosmetology is an exciting, expressive and ever evolving field that has the potential to do anything from keeping someone looking their best for an upcoming event to creating the film and movie effects we all love. Considering a career in cosmetology will require training and dedication to your leaning and perfecting your skill, but it will also involve a lot of communication. By remembering these client communication tips, you can feel more comfortable dealing with clients in the capacity of cosmetology no matter what your specialization is.

Did learning about the importance of communication skills in cosmetology interest you? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Hairstyles: Cornrows, Wraps, Bumps, Updos and Braiding

New hairstyles can be difficult to get comfortable with. Whether you got a new cut or have been stuck in a rut, trying a new ‘do can be intimidating. New styles feel unfamiliar and it can be discouraging when what you’re seeing in the mirror looks nothing like the picture or tutorial you were consulting.

When you finally find a style or two that works for you, it may be a challenge to keep yourself from falling into a hairstyle routine. It can be hard to motivate yourself to try something new. But even slight changes can make a big difference in the overall presentation of your hair. Here are a few things to remember about some of the most common hairstyles and variations you may want to try out on your beautiful locks.

Hairstyle #1: Cornrows

Properly Stretch or Straighten Your Hair Before Beginning

Flattening out the kinks in your hair is important to avoid inconsistencies in your cornrow hairstyle. The methods and tools used for this will depend on the kind of hair you have. The softer and straighter your hair is, the easier it will be to smooth out all the waves and curls. However, once stretched, coarser hair is far better at securely holding cornrows for longer periods of time.

Make Sure Your Parts Are Clean

Each part you make is a defining line in your cornrow hairstyle. It is important that each of your parts is as clean as possible no matter how thick or thin you’re planning on making your cornrows. You should use a finely pointed tool to create parts and separate each section, then clip each section to avoid confusion throughout the hairstyling process.

Make Sure to Plan Around Your Hair’s Unique Features

Don’t forget to take the specifics of your hair into account when planning out your hairstyle. The length, texture and volume of your hair are all important things to keep in mind. If you have questions about the possibility or impossibility of a specific style, you can always consult a licensed hairstylist.

Consider Going to A Professional for Complicated Designs

There are plenty of capable people who are able to create precise and stylish cornrows, but there are some designs that may be better left to the technique of a professional. You know better than anyone else whether you need to bring in a pro to complete a head-turning, jaw-dropping statement cornrows.

Hairstyle #2: Wraps

Secure or Style Your Hair Prior To Wrapping

Whether you are using your wrap as a style accessory to accentuate a hairstyle or are wrapping your hair to protect it, your hair needs to be sorted out first. If you are wrapping your hair for aesthetic reasons, you’ll want to make sure that you have your hair styled in a way that will show off your scarf/wrap and your hair the way you want it to. If you are wrapping it for a reason you will want to make sure that your hair is securely pinned to avoid rubbing and breakage.

Pick A Wrap That Is Comfortable and Fashionable

Wearing a wrap can be a tremendous attention-grabbing hairstyle move, but you want to make sure that it’s one you won’t regret throughout the day. Consider the weather and outside temperature when you choose a fabric to wrap your hair with. You’ll also want to pick something that isn’t too stiff but also will stay securely fastened.

Think About Wrapping for Bedtime

The tossing and turning of sleep can create a mangled mess in your hairstyle. Moving and rolling can mean tangling, breaking and splitting your hair. Keeping your hair tightly wrapped while you sleep will help avoid damage that can be done when you aren’t even awake.

Hairstyle #3: Bumps

Use the Right Bump Tools

Everything from the thickness and texture of your hair to the shape and size of your head are factors in choosing the tools to create the perfect hairstyle. While some hair can be teased into a bump without any additional aid, some hair is too soft or thin to get that kind of lift without a bump tool placed beneath a layer of hair for height.

Lift Your Ponytail

Ponytails are a common hairstyle that spans all lengths and textures. Giving a little bump to the front of those ponytails can completely revitalize an otherwise bland hairstyle. While you should use your own personal tastes and best judgement when choosing the size of your ponytail bump, longer, thicker hair can typically get away with bigger bumps.

Add Dimension to A Fancy Updo

Updo hairstyles are a classy way to bring elegance and sophistication to your look. You can keep that class from turning stuffy by pumping a bit of that glamour into the front of your refined style by simply giving it a bump.

Give Some Height to A Short Hairstyle

Short haircuts might seem like they run short in style options but adding a bump can really open some interesting style options. If your hair is long enough to cover a bump tool or thick enough to be properly fluffed and teased, a bump hairstyle is an option.

Hairstyle #4: Updos

Know What You Are Working With

Updos can be incredibly exciting and have the potential to be full of personality. The vast array of varying techniques and styles can be downright inspirational. However, not every hairstyle is compatible with all types of hair. Don’t set yourself or your hairstylist up for failure by marrying yourself to an unrealistic style. You should pick an updo that will flaunt just how fabulous it is.

Casual Tie-Up

Ponytails of all variations are a good way to get your hair up off your neck and draw attention to your face. The specifics of your hairstyle look can be tweaked and perfected by experimenting with the angle of the ponytail, how much of your hair is tied up in the ponytail and adding a variety of accessories.

Classic French Twist

Twisting up your hair can easily create a look of professionalism and refinement. The key to a French twist that will hold through rough days on the job or lively nights on the town is to remember that stability is everything. Whether you use pins, combs, or clips make sure that your twist is tightly in place.

Extreme/Unique Updos

There are some events that require something out of the ordinary. Your hair has unique qualities specific to you, and having a hairstyle designed with your hair in mind can add to a celebration or ceremony. Sometimes a hairstylist is the best way to go when you want to bring a little more art to your cosmetology.

Hairstyle #5: Braiding

Keep in Mind How Long You Want to Keep Your Braids In

Braids can be part of a one time look or be the foundation of all your hairstyles. It all depends on the qualities of your hair and your personal preferences. Softer hair will likely be easier to braid on a daily basis whereas coarser hair has more long-term braid options available. It truly depends on what you want, what kind of hair you’re working with, and the talent of your stylist.

Accent Your Hairstyle with A Statement Braid

There is no rule that says if you want to include braids into your hairstyle that it has to include all of your hair. Adding a tiny braid or two at the base of your neck or behind your ear can be a fun, carefree accent to almost any hairstyle.

Think About Deviating from The Typical 3-Section Braid

We all typically think of the same thing when we think of a braid, three sections of hair alternately overlapping. While that is certainly the most common type of braid incorporated into hairstyles, there are many different kinds of twists and braids that could add some spice into your look. The degree of complication varies which allows you to be as creative or efficient as you want to be with your hairstyles.

Braid It Up!

Your braids don’t have to fall to your shoulders. You could braid your hair upward into a messy. Trendy updo or braid your hair into a neat halo around the crown of your head. Thinking outside of the box with your braiding can lead to some magical hairstyles and memorable looks.

Infinite Possibilities

There are an infinite number of hairstyles and style variations you could try depending on how you’ve grown out or cut your hair. There are no limitations on the simplicity or the complexity of the style you choose to wear. If you are having more serious difficulty styling and coming up with ideas for your hair, it could be time to switch things up. Talk to your hairstylist. You can get advice on styling tips, product and tool recommendations for better results, and professional opinions on cuts and changes you are considering for your hair. Creating a hairstyle you feel confident and enthusiastic about wearing can make lasting impressions, even on those just walking by.

Interested in Learning More?

Did learning about cornrows, wraps, bumps, updos and braiding interest you? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Places to Work as an Entry-Level Hairstylist

Entry-level hairstylist working on mannequin

Hairstyling encompasses many different areas of haircare. It can include conditioning, repairing, cutting, styling, bleaching, and dying hair, along with services including performing hair treatments and providing hair extensions. These are the skills an entry-level hairstylist will use to help people feel and look like the best, truest versions of themselves. The skills of a qualified hairstylist inspires the imagination, creates a feeling, makes a statement or grabs someone’s attention. Their talents can help people make their look iconic.

Questions to Ask as an Entry-Level Hairstylist

  • What is my next move going to be?
  • What are my career goals?
  • Where am I going to get the experience I need to achieve those goals?
  • Which jobs will give me what I am looking for as an entry-level hairstylist?

You can be the most skilled, innovative hairstylist and still be confused about where to start. Where you begin your career depends on where you are and what you want. However, here are some unique suggestions to kick off your career that will help you head in the right direction.

Gain Experience in a Salon

The most common place for entry-level hairstylists to begin their career is in a salon. Cutting, shampooing, coloring, styling and treating hair in an environment gives entry-level hairstylists a high volume of walk-in clients and tons of valuable experience. It allows you to get used to different hair textures and conditions so that you can feel confident in whatever your next step might be.

The Value of Salon Jobs for Entry-Level Hairstylists

Rushing into a high-pressure performance hairstylist job as soon as you are certified can be difficult. Salon work allows entry-level hairstylists to earn a living and become a seasoned stylist. While any salon job gives you the opportunity to impress clients and succeed, it is also important for the you as a hairstylist to keep your end goals in mind. Entry-level hairstylists should find a salon that has an atmosphere they connect with and that has opportunities for experience in whatever they hope to specialize in.

Participate in Small Projects

Fashion and Film Hairstylists

Fashion and film hairstylist jobs are highly coveted and hard to come by, particularly for entry-level hairstylists. It is hard to get noticed or gain experience in such exclusive fields when the hairstylist doesn’t have any connections in the industry. It can feel like it is impossible to find a way in, but don’t give up. Gain experience and build a resume by finding smaller local projects to participate in.

Exploring Connections

Look around any college campuses that have a film program and see if they need a hairstylist. The entry-level hairstylist should get in touch with local and charity fashion show coordinators to let them know that their skills are available for any of their upcoming events. And if the entry-level hairstylist is in an area that has limited opportunities even on the underground level, take matters into your own hands and make your own opportunities.

Fashion Shows

The entry-level hairstylist’s dream may be to create interesting looks for the runway. They may want to work in print fashion as a stylist, so start an underground fashion ‘zine using friends as models. When it comes to getting these high-level jobs, it is important to get a foot in the door and build a portfolio.

Concentrate on Color

Color is an ever-expanding facet of hair styling. Coloration blends chemistry with the artistry of visual fashion for the ultimate self-expression. Now more than ever, people are experimenting with extreme and unique hair coloring.

Techniques for Entry-Level Hairstylists

A job in coloring, even at an entry-level, can allow you to perfect your technique while creating and developing their own color combinations. This is a sector of styling that is constantly pushing the boundaries of fashion and creativity.

Seize every opportunity to help clients realize their personal vision of themselves by practicing different coloring skills. Even small coloring jobs like highlights and lowlights can teach entry-level hairstylists important skills. Small changes can make a big difference if they are made by someone who cares about what they are doing.

Enter Competitions

While this isn’t a job suggestion, hairstyling competitions are a great way to make a name for yourself and gain recognition in the cosmetology industry. They can be difficult to find and get involved in depending on where they are, but participating in a styling competition might be a good idea for an entry-level hairstylist to take advantage of the opportunity.

You don’t have to be the “winner” of the show to gain valuable experience from a competition. Adding a competitive element to professional training can help push you to the next level and allow an expanding portfolio. A strong portfolio and a history of competitive styling experience can look good to higher end salons and celebrity clients, who would otherwise be difficult to reach. It is also a great way to perform under pressure if your plan is to break into a competitive field of hairstyling.

Social Media Marketing

Social media is a good place to expose a wide range of people to your work. There are a lot of different mediums in social media to show off your skills, so it depends on personal preferences. Create a hairstyling how-to vlog on YouTube, a Instagram account full of your best work or create daily hairstyling tips.

Social Media Considerations

However, there are a few things that one should consider and keep in mind before embarking on an online journey to show off your hairstyling . First, it might be a good idea to separate your personal and professional accounts. Having something strictly dedicated to professional work will be less conflicting and more attractive to potential customers or endorsers.

Competition in Social Media

Another thing to consider when creating a social media presence is that it is an incredibly open and competitive route. Being authentic will help create and maintain a genuine relationship that will turn into steady revenue. Try to approach the content in a unique, new, or interesting way that will show off your work in a way that will keep your audience and endorsers wanting more.

Style for a Brand

Commercial styling covers a wide range of mediums. Essentially, a stylist works for a brand and is part of a team responsible for the appearance of their models. This includes styling a model’s hair before a photoshoot to styling an executive spokesperson before a promotional speech.

The entry-level hairstylist may be called on for video hairstyling for product commercials. It is a career path that can provide an exhilarating array of experiences and can offer travel and event opportunities.

Getting Started in Branding

Styling for a big name brand might not be possible right off the bat, but there are plenty of new cosmetic and hair product companies. Look for smaller brands that may have the potential for long term success.

Stay away from quick fix, highly synthetic products and align with natural products that have a greater chance of success without doing harm to customers. It is important to get experience, even if it is with a new company or product line. Do the best to get to know any of the brands before approaching them.

Be Creative!

Dedication to the profession and creative problem solving will dictate how far an entry-level hairstylist will go and how high they will soar. It might not always be easy, particularly at first. Find different methods of making things happen. Try things that have never been done before. Come up with ways to make a path if something isn’t panning out.

Talent and passion can be more than a paycheck. The entry-level hairstylist should get all the experience they can in all areas of hair and cosmetology, even when what they want long term isn’t available immediately. Then they will use their knowledge and experience to get what they want from their career.

Want to Learn More?

Ready to lay a foundation as an entry-level hairstylist that will open unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

The Dos and Don’ts of Hair Coloring

Hairstylist providing a hair coloring consult

Coloring your hair is one of the biggest changes you can make to rejuvenate your appearance. You may be nervous about making such a serious decision about your look, and rightfully so. There is a lot to consider, but also a lot to be excited about. Preparation, the hair coloring itself and aftercare are all important to the success of your hair color changes, and it is important to consider each area very carefully before going all in on a brand-new look.

Hair Color Preparation

Before your hair undergoes whatever color transformation you have planned for it there are things that you need to do to prepare. Hair dyes and bleaches have harsh chemicals that can be extremely hard on your hair, particularly if you aren’t careful beforehand. Starting with healthy hair may not be the most glamorous or fun part of the coloring process, but it is essential to successfully achieving the look that you are going for.

Hair Color Preparation Do’s

Invest in a good conditioner and hair serum

The amount of damage done when coloring can be minimized by making good choices about the hair dyes you use, but at the end of the day hair coloring requires the use of chemicals. The harsh effect of these chemicals can be amplified if you’re starting with hair follicles that are already damaged. Achieving a proper moisture balance can help strengthen and revitalize any damage you may have already done before stressing your hair out with bleaches and colors.

Be patient with your hair

Try your best to be patient with your hair. I know you can hardly stand to wait for your exciting new color transformation to happen but rushing things can lead to disappointing results. Being in a hurry could cause you to damage your hair to the point that it takes months or even years to come back properly. It can be difficult not to shortcut to the “fun” part, but it will be worth it when the final result looks every bit as good as you want it to.

Hair Color Preparation Don’ts

Turn down the heat

Curling irons, flat irons and hair dryers are some of the most commonly used heated styling tools, but can cause damage if not used carefully. Even using them too frequently can cause hair to be dry and brittle. Before embarking on your exciting color adventure, it might be wise to minimize the use of hot tools and give your hair a break. This could be a good time to explore heat-free styling techniques and think outside the box a little bit.

Don’t waste dye on damaged ends

Leaving split and fried ends is never a good idea, but especially when it comes to coloring. Getting rid of dead, dry ends will help your hair repair itself and can assist with the overall health and growth of your hair. Even if you are only getting highlights or touching up some gray, cleaning up damaged ends is a helpful step in preparing for whatever colors you have in mind for the beautiful new you.

Hair Coloring

Whether you want a vibrant, multi-colored rainbow look with color transitions and fading or you are looking for some hi-lights or lo-lights, coloring is an incredible way to breathe new life into your hairstyle. Here are some tips to make sure that all of that change to your look ends up being for the better.

Hair Coloring Do’s

Choose a hair colorist you trust

This might seem difficult if you don’t already have a reliable hair colorist you go to already. It can be challenging to feel like you can trust someone you’ve never met with such a dramatic and immediately visible change to your look. You can ask other professionals in the cosmetology field for their recommendations, ask friends for advice, and look at online reviews to help you feel more at ease with the idea. Make sure that the hair colorist you choose is certified in their field and operating from a licensed salon.

Know what you want before you make the appointment

Having a basic concept of what you want can work in some areas of cosmetology and beauty, but hair color is specific. Mere shades can make a significant difference in the way a look comes together.  having a vague idea or acting spontaneously can lead to fantastic looks, but often they lead to disappointment, regret, and some serious revitalization treatments. Being sure about your decision is the best way to know you’ll be happy with it long term, so don’t be afraid to take your time and think on it if you need to.

Communicate as clearly as you can with your hair color specialist

Sometimes, words fail us. You try to explain the specific look you are going for, but it can be hard to know if you got your message across. Therefore, it is always wise to have multiple visual references of the colors and affects you are looking for to show to your hair colorist. This will allow them to ask you questions and voice any concerns they may have with your hair color goals. It will also allow you to discuss alternatives and solutions to any issues there may be. A clear understanding between you and your hair colorist about what you are hoping for will help you get an end result you are thrilled with and help your hair colorist give that to you. Sometimes, a picture really is worth a thousand words.

Hair Coloring Don’ts

Resist the urge to take on big color projects without professional help

It can be tempting to impulsively run to your nearest beauty supply store and grab boxes of hair dye the second the idea comes to mind. For extremely simple color projects a DIY dye kit might do the trick. However, even those can be messy, uneven and can end up fading quickly. Utilizing professional skills allows the benefit of professional products and equipment, keeps you from damaging your belongings with chemicals and colors, and keeps you from accidentally damaging your hair.

Rushing isn’t an option

All coloring is a process. Some styles take longer than others and a lot depends on the hair you are starting with. Your natural color, texture, cut, and previous coloring history all play a factor in how long the process takes. Prepare for a few hours of time in most cases and don’t schedule your appointment on an already busy day if you can possibly help it.

Take advice carefully

There is a definite difference between taking advice or suggestions and being bullied by a hair stylist into a look you didn’t really want. If your hair colorist suggests something you like, go for it! If they have a concern, discuss it and allow them to provide you with an alternative. But there is also no shame in going home and thinking about it before you say yes to any changes to the original plan.

Hair Aftercare

After the hair coloring is done, the best part begins! You are all ready for the world to get a good look at the striking new you. There are some things you are going to want to keep in mind so that you can keep the look you want for as long you want it.

Hair Aftercare Do’s

Invest in a leave-in treatment to protect your hair

Of you course you are going to want to immediately show off your new look, but make sure you protect it. A conditioning treatment that doesn’t need to wash out will help maintain a protective barrier against the impact of things like brushing, twisting and tying. Also, it will maintain moisture for those times you want to curl or straighten it.

Include a dry shampoo into your routine to reduce fading

The more you wash, the more your hair color fades. However, no one should sacrifice hygiene for color, no matter how truly epic it is. Dry shampoo will help you keep your hair clean without compromising the color with the scrub and rinse of a traditional shampoo. Lather shampooing will still be necessary, but dry shampoo will help you keep you color for as long as possible.

Make regular appointments for touch-ups

Touching up your exciting new look after hair growth or fading will help you keep it as vibrant as it was on day one. The more dramatic your look, the more frequent your touch-ups will need to be. Keep up that gorgeous new look and keep turning heads!

Hair Aftercare Don’ts

Avoid shampooing your hair in extremely hot water

Not only can hot water damage follicles, but it also is more effective at fading and washing out dyes. Washing with warm water instead of hot will help you cleanse without damaging. Rinsing with cold water after conditioning can help seal in the moisture.

Stay away from products with sulfates

Sulfates are a harsh detergent ingredient found in many common shampoos. It acts as an astringent to clean dirt and excess oils, but it can also be harsh and damaging to your beautiful new look. If you are having trouble finding a shampoo that isn’t harmful to the style you love, ask your hair colorist or hairstylist for some product recommendations.

The color changes you make to your look can be as shocking or as subtle as you want them to be. Following these tips will help you both achieve and maintain your hair color.

Ready to lay a foundation as a salon hair colorist that will open up unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Questions to Ask Before Choosing a Cosmetology Program

Teacher Helping Students Training To Become Hairdressers

Considering enrolling in a cosmetology program? There are many different career options to consider along with education requirements and certifications. Maybe you’re familiar with products and techniques but want to find a program that will help you use those skills as a cosmetologist.

There are opportunities in all areas of cosmetology that would be fulfilling career options. Some are traditional, others are out of the box. There are career choices that are mainstream and ones that are more niche. Choosing the right cosmetology program for you means knowing what you want and what you can give to it. A good way to figure those things out is to ask yourself these questions.

Question #1: What are My Talents and Passions?

It makes sense that if you enjoy what you are learning about, you are more likely to stick with it. Likewise, your cosmetology skills will be amplified in a career that is exciting and fulfilling. When you are considering a cosmetology program you should take a moment to look at your areas of experience along with your natural gifts.

There are more career choices in beauty and cosmetology than you might think. You could have a career in the fields of hairstyling, nail artwork, esthetician services, or salon management. There are even more specific specialties within each of those career fields, so take your time when looking into your options. You want to do your research to pick the cosmetology program that correlates with your specific goals and strengths.

Cosmetology and Interpersonal Skills

It is also important to ask yourself if you have strong people skills. Being socially talented is beneficial when it comes to work in cosmetology. You will be working with other people no matter what specialized field you decide to explore, even if they aren’t your clients. It’s important that you work and communicate with others well regardless of what cosmetology program you decide on.

Follow-Up Questions:

  • What are the cosmetic, beauty, or wellness talents that you feel the most inspired by?
  • Are there any skills or areas you’re are exceptionally confident in?
  • Have you completed any other programs or attained any certifications that might be beneficial to your new career goals?

Question #2: What are My Ultimate Career Goals?

As with most career paths, it is likely that you will work your way up to where you want to be. However, knowing where you’d like to end up and what your personal definition of success is will help you identify the most efficient and effective program choices. Be certain you are going to get a thorough education in all the areas necessary for long-term success. That may include knowing about the business side of beauty.

Defining Success

There are many ways to achieve success. It’s a matter of knowing what success looks like to you. Working for yourself gives you the advantage of being in control and in charge of every aspect of your career. It can also be a lot of pressure. Being employed by a salon or spa provides a certain level of stability and access to more equipment and products than you might have on your own. Working for an employer can also take a lot of your personal choices and preferences out of consideration. It all depends on your personality type, your resources and your commitment level.

Follow-Up Questions:

  • Do you think you would prefer being an entrepreneur, or an employee of a salon?
  • Do you plan on having a performance based, or education-based career?
  • What kind of space, equipment and products will you need to achieve your long-term career ambitions?
  • Can you see yourself traveling to and working out of your client’s homes?

Question #3: Am I Ready to Create a Plan for Success?

You deserve to have the cosmetology career of your dreams. This means setting aside time and energy to educate yourself in your area of expertise. Life can be challenging and the demands of daily life can be a lot to handle. It can seem like you will never have the resources to complete the courses you need to get started.

You may never find the “perfect” time to enter an education program. Being busy is inevitable these days. Make sure you are in a good place mentally and physically when you begin a new cosmetology career. Over extending yourself can lead to burn out and frustration. A certain level of stress comes when you work for anything in life. You can achieve whatever you set your mind to. Achieving success takes commitment and dedication. When you begin your cosmetology education be prepared to give yourself the very best, because you deserve nothing less.

Follow-Up Questions:

  • What level of dedication do you think is reasonable to expect of yourself?
  • How many hours a week do you have available?
  • Is there anything that you are prioritizing over your career goals?

Question #4: What Kind of Cosmetology Program Will Fit Best?

After considering the demands you can currently manage, it is time to map your path into cosmetology. You should look at what kind of programs are available to you, so you know what kind of options you’re working with. Look at the kind of classes and courses you can choose from, but also investigate which schedule options would fit best with your lifestyle and current commitments.

Starting a new career and taking classes for cosmetology can be a big change. The less you must change about the rest of your life, the more you will be able to concentrate on your study schedule. However, don’t be afraid to make your dreams a priority by making changes and balancing your personal schedule in a way that prioritizes what you want.

Follow-Up Questions:

  • What is the duration of each of the cosmetology programs you are considering?
  • Are you willing to travel to find a cosmetology program that fits your goals?
  • Are your career goals as a priority?

Conclusion

Many people would benefit from your talents and your gifts. Your passion and excitement could be what inspires them to feel confident and pursue their own ambitions. Starting a career in cosmetology will require training and dedication, but what waits is a career that is fulfilling and a life you can be enthusiastic about. You must ask yourself the right questions to figure out how to get what you want.

Want to Learn More?

Did learning about the questions to ask before choosing a cosmetology program interest you? Ready to lay a foundation that will open up unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Manager or Owner?: Operating a Successful Salon

Salon manager holding keys to business

Want to become a hairstylist? Do you want to manage or own a salon some day? Working in the beauty industry is highly rewarding. Whether you specialize in hairstyling or your goal is to become a master manicurist, there are many possibilities for career growth. After you graduate from a cosmetology program, you may decide to become a salon manager or owner. There are many differences and similarities in these roles and understanding the variations can help you to become the best manager and owner possible.

What it Takes to Run a Successful Salon

Whether you are a salon manager or owner, there are many things you need to know to successfully run a salon. Managing financials is important to ensure the salon is profitable. The management of staff, as well as supplies and facilities is crucial for both managers and owners. Providing a high-end experience for your customers is imperative to success for both a manager or owner.

Even more, a salon is only as successful as the number of customers it has. There are several aspects that go into obtaining and keeping customers. These aspects include hiring skilled hairstylists offering a positive experience. It also includes the use of proper marketing techniques and reasonable pricing. Opening a business in the right area is also an important key to running and owning a successful salon. Think about the different variables of a successful salon and keep improving it over time.

Managers and Owners: What’s the Difference?

Salon Managers

Managers oversee the day-to-day operations of a salon. They hire, interview, order supplies and schedule employees. The salon manager is responsible for running the salon. It is the manager’s job to identify problems and ensure the business thrives under their management.

Salon Owners

In contrast, owners of salons plan out the business and create it from the ground up. The owner works on building their business using marketing and advertising techniques. In some cases, an owner acts as both owner and manager. Many owners decide that they are too busy to manage the salon and have managers on duty. They may also operate multiple salons and need a manager that is responsible for each salon.

Which Role is Right for You?

Salon Owners and Entrepreneurship

Knowing which job is right for you will help you succeed in your role as owner or manager. Owners are at the forefront of the business. Business owners are always there when they are needed. This can become difficult if the owner is operating multiple salons. In order to consider ownership, you need to have the entrepreneurial spirit to create and run a business. This involves financial planning, funding, marketing, advertising, accounting and hiring the right staff.

Salon Managers: The Problem Solvers

Similarly, managers handle day-to-day business operations, while reporting to the owner. Business operations may include handling employees and customers. Salon managers are responsible for resolving problems. The manager is also in charge of ordering, scheduling and hiring. Managers need to be tough enough to handle difficult situations, like disciplining employees. However, the manage also needs to be empathetic enough to handle customer complaints.

Why Both Roles are So Rewarding

While all professions have their difficulties, being either a manager or business owner can be incredibly rewarding. Having ownership of a salon allows you to reap the financial benefits of your entrepreneurship. You have a skill and are using it to create a service. Managers also reap the rewards, such as running a successful business and earning a reasonable salary.

How An Education Prepares You

Whether you choose to go into a managerial role or you’re looking at salon ownership, your career starts with the right education. Education allows you to know the ins and outs of cosmetology and become a true asset to the field. After all, whether it involves hair cutting, makeup or nail care and design, your skills are the reason customers come to the salon in the first place. Repeat customers are the backbone of successful salons. The best way to create a repeat customer is to provide them with a highly-skilled service with great customer care.

Did learning about being a manager or owner of a salon interest you? Ready to lay a foundation as a salon hairstylist that will open up unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Wigs, Extensions & Weaves: A Cosmetologist’s Guide

Hairsylist providing hair consultation for hair weaves.

If you are on social media or searching through hair magazines for hair inspiration, cosmetology may be right for you. Hair is all about experimenting, creative expression and finding the artist in you. With Instagram, Facebook and other social platforms you can follow celebrity hairstylists, celebrities, or influencers. If this sounds like you, then you may enjoy seeing how weaves, wigs, and extensions can help your hair goals.

Hair alternatives make it easy to experiment on hair. Taking a trip to the beauty salon could mean leaving with Beyoncé’s long, sleek luxurious look, sacrificing a couple of hours of time.

Cosmetology will teach you all the fascinating ways to work with wigs, install weaves and create styles that protect natural hair without the use of chemicals like perms, dyes, glue and heat. There are also more options available, for someone who wants to try a certain look without a long-term commitment.

The Many Types of Weaves

There are many different types of hair weaves. Extensions, Lace front or lace closure wig or weave are the most popular options. Then there are sew- ins. Sew-ins offer options like a flip over, where it gives you two sets of partings and then you have a c-parting. This creates curved parts.

What Are the Different Processes for Each Type?

The process of getting a wig or weave uses bundles of hair and a lace to create the wig or weave for the client. Braiding the client’s hair allows a flat base. Bundles connect to the base using a special stitching method with hair thread.

Partial Coverage

With partials the hairstylist will braid most of the hair, except for a small section at the top of head. This allows the hairstylist to cover the weave tracks and create a parting. The hairstylist will then sew down 2-4 bundles on the base. These give the partial weave a natural look and using the client’s own hairline. This type of style requires maintenance of the client’s natural hair or breakage will occur.

Comb Overs (Vixen)

The hairstylist applies weaves with tracks to different sections of the hair instead of braiding the hair back or into a pattern resembling a beehive. Hair stays out around the edges, and down the middle of the head, allowing more versatility when styling the client’s hair. This style makes buns, ponytails and French braids easy to create. The vixen is ideal when the natural hair is long and healthy.

Full Head Coverage

Wigs require a spandex cap to ensure comfort and removal. Certain lace system applications need a temporary hold gel to set the lace front. They can be a lace closure or a full-lace frontal.

Lace frontals are best when used to recreate a new hairline. This is good if the client suffers from thinning edges or any kind of hair loss at the top of their head. Frontals are a protective style where none of the hair shows. This allows options for pulled-back hairstyles.

Extensions

Clip-Ins

A temporary method that does not damage the natural hair. Large pieces of tracks clip in the client’s hair.

Micro Links

Hair loops around natural hair and requires a hot gun and metal rings to attach. Extensions last for months at a time and are a permanent bond. Individual pieces contain more hair, which makes them heavier for clients. Due to the weight, extensions are not recommended for people with thin hair. You should use less of the extensions on people with normal density hair, so the weight balances throughout the entire head.

Glue-On

This type of extension requires glue for installation on the client’s hair.

Double Sided Tape/Tape-In

One piece of tape is above the hair in the middle, and one piece of tape is below the hair. Double-sided tape lasts 6-8 weeks. During the consult, the hairstylist should give an idea of how many pieces the look will take, as well as where they will place their extensions for a natural look.

How Long Does it Take for A Wig, Extension or Weave Install?

The time varies based on three factors: the stylist doing the hair, the texture of the natural hair and the style preferred by the client. Wigs, extensions and weaves usually take 2-4 hours to complete.

How Long Do Extensions or Weaves Last?

Keeping the client’s extension or weave in depends on the client’s hair, skin type, and hair texture. The wig or weave must be of good quality, so synthetic hair is not recommended. Weaves have a shorter life compared to wigs, usually lasting 3-4 weeks. Wigs can last anywhere between three weeks to several years. Extensions depend on the type the client chooses to use, but should never stay in the hair over four months at a time or over two inches of hair growth.

Do Weaves Hurt?

Braiding the natural hair may result in a little tension depending on the person doing the braiding. The process of the installation should not involve any pain.

Hairpiece Upkeep and Maintenance

There are many maintenance products available. Hairstylists should consider the texture of the hair that the client has chosen to use. Curly hairstyles need a curling mousse to help keep the curls neat. For straight hair, use heat protecting spray. For a silky straight or body waves, recommend a good holding spray after curling or straightening. Hair extension routines should consist of placing the hair in a low pony at night and dry completely at the roots when wet. This can prevent major damage to the hair, preventing matting and help the hair last longer.

How Often Should I Shampoo My Hair?

This is up to the person wearing the weave.  The client will want to consider how many days a week they will wear the hair. What type of activity will be taking place while wearing the hair? If the client intends on daily wear, the weave may need a bi-weekly shampoo. Shampoo weaves less often to avoid the natural hair braid from loosening. The client should care for the same as they would natural hair.

Can I Dye and Style Weaves?

Yes, any color dye is safe for human hair. You can flat iron, curl, style, or leave the hair out to air-dry it. Invisible tape pieces are available in sets of 30 shades, so instead of dyeing to match, stylists match the shade to the last five inches of the natural hair.

Can You Take Out Your Own Weave?

Clients can remove their own extensions at home, but it is best to see a trained hair professional to prevent natural hair damage. When installing a weave, thread the hair for security. Follow the thread and cut, it will then unravel. It usually only takes about one hour depending on the person taking it out.

Is False Hair Bad for Your Natural Hair?

Don’t use temporary ways of adding hair every day, as they attach large pieces to a small part of the head. Use them sparingly so there is not long-term damage to the natural hair.

Permanent bonded hair pieces or spandex cap pieces last an entire lifetime and will not cause damage if the client uses the correct maintenance. Check and fit the pieces once they start to grow out to keep them from pulling on the natural hair.

Did learning about wigs, extensions and weaves interest you? Ready to lay a foundation as a salon hairstylist that will open up unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Confidence & Cosmetology: Beauty Inside and Out

Looking in the mirror is a different experience for everybody. Some of us feel happy, some of us feel insecure, others of us are almost entirely indifferent to our appearance. Whatever the case is, cosmetologists instill a sense of pride and confidence for clients. Makeup and hair can be useful tools that can help your clients feel beautiful, strong, confident and important. Cosmetic work can do wonders for a person’s self-esteem, when approached in the right way. 

Listen to Requests and Consult References

 When someone comes to you for a new style, they will either have photos or descriptions of their desired look. Having an outline of what your client wants can be helpful, but it also leads to a lot of pressure. It will be helpful to remember a couple of things when dealing with this kind of client.

Remember that this experience is about the client feeling good.

Once the cosmetologist finishes with their work, they want their client to feel a significant boost of confidence and self-esteem. When the client looks at themselves, they should see the look they were hoping for. Cosmetologists should side with the client’s request even if the cosmetologist has other preferences.

Be upfront about unrealistic expectations.

Cosmetologists should never shy away from a good challenge. Evens uperior cosmetology skills can’t morph someone’s face into their favorite celebrity. If clients need a reality check, focus on what they can expect to see rather than what the cosmetologist can’t deliver.

Ask Good Questions

As a cosmetologist, you should understand what your client wants before you begin. Not every client is going to come prepared with explicit instructions and a bunch of visuals. Prepare to do a bit of investigative work when necessary. If you are unsure of your client’s expectations, here are a few things you can ask to help gain clarification.

Is it for a special occasion?

This can help the cosmetologist gauge how bold the look should be. Your client may have an idea of the look they want, but cosmetologists should make sure that they use the right styles to compliment their look.

What are your favorite features?

This will help the cosmetologist know what to stress and even what to avoid or conceal. Knowing the things that your client already feels confident about will help them amplify that confidence while down playing other features.

What color is the outfit you’re planning to wear to the event?

If the cosmetologist has a client who needs hair and/or makeup done for a specific event, it is important to know what they will wear. This gives the cosmetologist color palette options, along with haircut and styling choices. No one wants their face and hair to clash with their fashion. Neutral tones and colors that compliment eye color are safe bets if the outfit is undecided.

Make Gentle Suggestions

There will be times that a cosmetologist will get a client who wants their makeup or hair done for a special occasion. The cosmetologist may have no input or suggestion when it comes to how they want the finished product to look. Making suggestions about someone’s appearance can feel like walking into a mine field. Here are some ways to navigate beauty clients without hurting their confidence or overwhelming them with options.

Do a thorough visual assessment before you say anything.

Some clients may not be able to determine their aesthetic strengths, so the cosmetologist should meet them halfway. The cosmetologist should look for areas they consider strengths, as well as more problematic challenges.

Go with compliments over criticisms.

When a cosmetologist explains suggestions, they should make sure that they focus on the positives. Concentrate on their strengths to boost confidence. The cosmetologist’s job is to make their clients look and feel better, not worse. The cosmetologist should help the client focus on the attractive qualities, while distracting them from flaws.

Don’t overwhelm them options and opinions.

Clients who aren’t particularly knowledgeable or interested in cosmetics might be intimidated by products and industry terms. The cosmetologist should use a visual assessment to come up with ideas that will work well for the client. Clients can still have a say in how they look, but aren’t flustered or frustrated by too much information.

As a cosmetologist, you have the gifts and skills to change the way people feel about and see themselves. You have the opportunity to help give clients looks that are not only unique and beautiful, but brave. Make their confidence your calling card.

Interested in learning more about becoming a cosmetologist and helping your clients improve their confidence level? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

Minnesota Cosmetology Licensing Exams Part 2: Chapter 155A

Student studying for cosmetology examThe second part of the Minnesota Board of Cosmetology Licensing Exam focuses on statutes and rules. The first half of the exam is about Chapter 155A and the second half of the exam is about  Chapter 2105. Part 3 of the blog series will tackle Chapter 2105 statutes and rules as compiled by the Minnesota Board of Cosmetology.

Cosmetology State Examination

This exam consists of 35 questions. You have 1 hour to complete this section. The Cosmetology State Examination focuses on general information about the Minnesota statutes, licensing, practice requirements, and enforcement.

The Chapter 155A statutes focus on definitions, board purpose and responsibilities and cosmetologist licensing. This section also focuses on license cycle, retired license, manager and instructor license requirements. This section also contains information on continuing education requirements, types of salons and services offered and not offered in salons. This chapter also talks about the statutes for enforcement, violations and penalties, inspections and proper license displays in salons.

Important Definitions to Remember

Manager – Someone that has a manager license and provides services under that license. This person manages cosmetologists, estheticians and nail technicians.

Salon – Rooms or areas within a commercial setting that offer cosmetology services. This does not include a client’s home.

Mobile Salon – Salon that is operated in a mobile vehicle or structure used exclusively for personal cosmetology services.

School – A location operated by a person that maintains a class to teach cosmetology to the public for compensation. This does not include community education under 10 hours that is intended for the self-improvement of participants.

Instructor – Person employed by a school to teach theoretical and practical cosmetology to future cosmetologists. The instructor must maintain an active operator or manager’s license.

Threading – A method of removing hair from the eyebrows, upper lip and other body parts using thread to pull hair from the follicles.

Statute 155A.20 Board Members

The Board of Cosmetology Examiners consists of seven members. All board positions are appointed by the governor. The board includes two cosmetologists, one private cosmetology school instructor, one public cosmetology school instructor, one esthetician, one nail technician, and one public member. All members must have an active license and have practiced cosmetology in the last five years.

Statute 155A.21 Protection of Health

This statute protects the health of the clients and cosmetologists from infection. This statute covers the use of chemicals, implements, apparatus, and other application of cosmetology that requires special education.

Statute 155A.23 Definitions

This statute defines terms including cosmetology, cosmetologist, esthetician and nail technician.

Cosmetology – The practice of personal services for the cosmetic care of the hair, nails and skin. Services include cleaning, conditioning, shaping, reinforcing and coloring. This practice also includes enhancing the head, scalp, face, arms, hands, legs, feet and trunk of the body.

Cosmetologist – Person who performs personal services listed above.

Esthetician – Person who performs personal services for the cosmetic care of the skin only.

Nail Technician – Person who performs personal services for the cosmetic care of the hands, feet and nails only.

Statute 155A.24 Board Authority

The board of cosmetology has the authority to hire personnel to assist in administrating the law, test and license applicants. The board may also conduct inspections and follow up on complaints.

Statue 155A.25 Cosmetology Fees & License Expiration Date

A three-year license fee is $195 for a practitioner, manager or instructor license. $115 is the cost of renewal of practitioner license, $145 for renewal of manager or instructor’s license. $350 for the initial salon license and $225 for each renewal of salon license. An initial school license is $4,000 and $2,500 for a renewal.

Penalties are assessed as $150 reinspection fee. There are also fees for expired licenses and failure to display current license. Salons may be penalized for failing to dispose of single-use equipment, implements or materials, and use of razors.

There are fees for an owner and manager allowing an operator to work as an independent contractor. In addition to this, there are fees for refusal or failure to cooperate with an inspection.

Administrative fees include homebound service permit, name change and certification of licensure. Additional fees include those for duplicate licenses, special permits,  temporary military licenses, and expedited licenses. There is also an additional fee for hair braider reigstration.

Licenses expire on the last day of the licensee’s birth month of the year due. Salon and school licenses expire on the last day of the month of initial licensure.

Statute 155A.27 Practitioner Definitions

The practitioner definition statute defines terms including licensing, qualification, testing, duration of the license, and renewal.

Licensing – A person must hold an individual license to practice as a cosmetologist, esthetician, nail technician, manager or instructor in the state.

Qualification – Qualification for licensing in each classification is set by the board and established by rule.

Testing – Testing must be done by a board approved provider.

Duration of the License – License is valid for three years.

Renewals – Renewals are valid for three years.

Statute 155A.275 Special Event Services

Special event services are services performed at a location other than the licensed salon for compensation. Special events may include styling, setting, reinforcing, or extending the hair. Applying makeup or nail polish is also covered by this statute. A special event permit is needed from the board. The person applying for a special event permit must have a valid manager’s license.

Statute 155A.29 Salon Compliance

For a salon to obtain a license, they must comply with all local and state laws. Laws include infection control, health and safety. The salon must have a licensed manager. The salon must also comply with workers’ compensation. Salons must have evidence of continued professional liability insurance coverage of at least $25,000 for each claim. The salon must also have $50,000 total coverage. A mobile salon must maintain a business address and notify the board of the location and schedule of the mobile salon.

The salon must adhere to minimum infection control standards. Salons may be inspected as often as the board considers necessary. A salon will not be allowed to operate in a room within a residential dwelling.

Statute 155A.31 Inspections

The board is responsible for inspecting salons and schools practicing or teaching cosmetology. If inspection shows a licensee fails to meet minimum standards, the board must present the risk to the public.

Statute 155A.32 Display of License

Every licensee must display the license in a visible place within the business.

Statute 155A.355 Prohibited Uses

This statute defines items of prohibited use including single-use equipment, skin-cutting equipment and banned substances.

Single-Use Equipment and Materials – Materials made of paper, wood or porous materials must be disposed after a single service. Failure to dispose of the single-use materials is subject to penalty.

Skin-Cutting Equipment – Use of razors and other skin cutting equipment used to cut or grate skin is prohibited.

Substances – The use of methyl methacrylate liquid monomers (MMA) and fumigants are prohibited.

Statute 155A.33 Enforcement

If the committee believes an individual has violated statutes or rules, they may be subject to legal action and/or cease and desist order.

Statute 155A.36 Violations & Penalties

Persons found in violation of the previous provisions are guilty of a misdemeanor.

Starting to prepare for the Minnesota Board of Cosmetology Licensing Exam? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. Upon completion, will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.

 

Historical Hairstyles: From Victorian Times to Today

Woman with historical hairstyleHairstyles, much like other fashion and beauty trends, have had a historical impact over time. Regardless of gender or style, hair makes a statement about your style. Not only does your hair hint at self-care and hygiene habits, but also showcases your personality. You can learn a lot about someone by just looking at their hairstyle, including its historical context. Each era has its own iconic hairstyles, allowing many old photographs to be dated based on hair itself! Here is hairstyles have changed throughout the years.

Victorian Historical Hairstyles

During the Victorian era, hairdressers became popular as women took interest in getting their hair styled professionally. Middle parts were all the rage as British fashion mirrored French styles. Women in this time took interest in adorning their hair with flowers rather than flashy trinkets.

Upper class women rarely wore their hair down in public, since a women’s hair was considered her most valuable asset. Because of this, bonnets and hats into outfits became common. Hair was also kept long, although regular trims were common.

Although there are photos of women freely sporting long, cascading waves, this particular hairstyle was considered wild and reserved for models and actresses. Most respectable women wore their hair in a intricately braided or twisted up do. Women would even add additional pieces of human hair, similar to modern day extensions, to give their hairstyle more volume and height.

The most important aspect of Victorian hair was neatness. Regardless of the style, hair had to be kept clean and shiny. The focus behind the hairstyles during this period was on the overall silhouette of the human body. Hair was meant to be styled in a way that made the body appear balanced.

The Roaring ’20s Historical Hairstyles

The era of raging consumerism boosted the economy and the men and women of this  period took major interest in various accessories. Hats, jewelry pins, bows and headbands were booming and evolving. As times changed, so did the common hair length–which had significantly shortened.

The fashionably chic, yet short bob is iconic for the 1920s. With this cut, all eyes were on the sparkling accessories used to adorn it. This cut transitioned easily into the following years when the Great Depression hit, as people couldn’t afford upkeep.

The short bob was, and still is, flattering for a wide range of face shapes due to its framing capabilities. It is also  easy to style since short tresses require less effort, as proven by the popular finger waves of the ’30s.

1950s Historical Hairstyles

On the verge of Hollywood’s Golden Age, people in the ’50s followed trends set by Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley and James Dean. Hairstyles took on a more dramatic look to mirror the styles on screen. These included perfectly coiffed styles with a deep side part or side swept curls.

Apart from the sculpted, iconic Hollywood velvet curls that many starlets donned, the ’50s were all about volume. Whether backcombing hair or by using accessories, hair needed to stand tall. Updos were also popular, but not nearly as intricate as they have been historically. Tight, perfect curls (pin curls) is an iconic look of the time, which was achieved with the help of plastic hair rollers.

Salon hair care grew in popularity as political conflict came to an end, allowing for more time and resources. For men, hair was often teased and greased back for a bit of natural volume. This simple hairdo was paired with prominent sideburns.

1970s Historical Hairstyles

As the era of free love and hippy culture ended, the relaxed nature of the period transformed hairstyles. Although styles had varied by this point in time, most people embraced their natural textures. Women opted for longer hairstyles and men chose softer, more natural looking fringe cuts.

The style of this era sported soft layers and highlights that played off existing looks. When it came to hair accessories, women opted for practical scrunchies and large claw clips. This decade saw a dramatic decrease in the use of hair products since natural looks were in style.

As a result, many of the hair care products in the ’70s were sources from all-natural ingredients, such as plants and herbs, to match the demand of the era. African Americans in particular wore their natural hair in pride and celebrated the unique textures resulting from Afros as the practice of chemical relaxants died down.

1980s Historical Hairstyles

The practical, no frills styles of the previous decade quickly went out of fashion, as the ’80s set no constraints to expressionism. Bigger, shinier and brighter was better during these eccentric times. This idea stood true for both hairstyles and fashion.

The powerful career woman sported a long bob that exuded the idea of balance between work life and social life. Other women went with bigger, more texturized styles that required lots of product to maintain. Madonna is one of the most popular hair icons of this time.

Hair dye became more popular as celebrities wore bright and vivid colors. Styles also became choppy and uneven as styles became edgier. The role of hairdressers was necessary as these hairstyles required more care.

Hairstyles in Present Day

The styling of hair has become an increasingly complex art supplemented by the generations and decades of former experience. Society has also grown diverse and accepting of unique looks.

Beachy waves became popular in the early 2000s and have remained trendy. Straight and sleek styles also have become common. Layers continue to be a popular choice for hairstyles of all lengths, leading to a myriad of looks in demand in salons everywhere.

Overall, present day hairstyles seem to resemble a mix of fashionable cuts and textures of days past. With advancements in hairstyling tools and nourishing products, grooming and upkeep has become much easier. The market has a variety of hair products to help achieve any look.

When becoming a hairstylist, it’s important to know the history behind the profession. Hairstylists are the artists behind trending hairstyles that end up leaving such a prominent mark in history. It’s crucial to be aware of trends of the past and how they have helped and evolved into the hairstyles that are popular today.

Ready to lay a foundation as a salon hairstylist that will open up unique opportunities in cosmetology and hairstyling? Need to get your undergraduate certificate in cosmetology first? At Minnesota School of Cosmetology, we are dedicated to helping our Cosmetology program students develop a solid foundation and a flair for style through hands-on training in basic and advanced industry techniques. You will learn how to cut, color and style hair, give manicures and pedicures, provide spa treatments and perform various skin care techniques from industry-experienced instructors in a professional salon setting. We keep our class sizes small to make sure you get the individualized instruction you need and attention you deserve. You will graduate with everything you need to be a versatile artist in an exciting industry, including a cosmetology diploma from a respected college.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a hairstylist and starting a rewarding career in the beauty industry.