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Minnesota School of Cosmetology Represented at State Capitol

Posted by on March 13, 2015

By: Jill Hocking

On Tuesday, March 10, 2015, Minnesota School of Cosmetology (MSC) students, campus director Jill Hocking and instructor Donna Dungy represented MSC at the State Capitol in regard to the S.F. No. 223 (Champion) cosmetology apprentice program. S.F. No. 223 (Champion) cosmetology apprentice program is a bill for an act proposing the right to qualify for state licensure to become a cosmetologist simply by completing an apprenticeship program consisting of approximately 3,000 hours of training in a salon setting under a licensed cosmetologist, rather than attending an educational institution.

“Preparing for the session was very educational, but the knowledge the students and I gained once we entered the legislation session was priceless,” said Dungy.

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The opposing views from those who represented MSC are quite similar across the board. The most popular view is simple: It takes a special person to be an educator and to teach cosmetology skills. A cosmetology education embraces much more than simply learning how to cut hair. There’s esthiology, nail technology, chemical relaxing, state laws and rules, and the biggest concern, safety and sanitation practices to keep the general public safe.

MSC student Hannah Parks passionately stated, “We get excellent education at Minnesota School of Cosmetology; you’re only as good as your teacher. You cannot learn everything about cosmetology from one or two individuals. At MSC, we have 12 instructors who are well-educated in all areas, but each one specializes in a specific area such as chemical relaxers, nail technology, skin care, hair color and haircutting.”

In an educational institution, students learn from multiple cosmetology specialists who are trained instructors. These educators are required to have continuing education credit hours annually and are overseen by an accreditation body which governs the school. The amount of infectious control information that students are required to learn is astonishing. The added requirements, and checks and balances at a school ensure cosmetologists are receiving the proper training and knowledge to learn cosmetology techniques but, most importantly, skills to keep the public safe.

S.F. No. 223 (Champion) was heard by the Senate State and Local Government Committee for consideration and advancement. After 45 minutes of testimony and discussion, the end result was to “lay the bill over” for possible consideration in the future.  The bill did not advance at this time, however, this will most likely be brought up again in the 2016 legislative session, so we will need to remain attentive. Your continued support is very important and much appreciated.


Thank you for your Interest in Minnesota School of Cosmetology.